kingawesomeness

The "Where are they now?" thread

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Young Australian Curtis Good hoping for a debut with Newcastle United

David Davutovic 31 October, 2013

 

FORMER Melbourne Heart defender Curtis Good has set his sights on an English Premier League debut after overcoming a hamstring strain.

 

Whilst injured the Young Socceroo has seen fellow Newcastle United youngsters Paul Dummett (22) and Massadio Haidara (20) given chances due to the defensive crisis which has hit the likes of Steven Taylor and Fabio Coloccini.

 

Good, 20, is among a new breed of stars set to be given an opportunity by new Socceroos boss Ange Postecoglou.

 

After playing in the League Cup final with Bradford City last season where he was on loan, Good made his Magpies debut two months ago in the League Cup win over Morecambe before injury struck in a reserves game against Bolton.

 

"It was only a relatively minor injury but the timing couldn't have been worse because of the injuries and suspensions," Good said.

 

"He (Alan Pardew) always talks to the youngsters and he said if I was fit I would've been given opportunities in last few weeks, which is a no-brainer. Two centre-halves were injured and one suspended.

 

"The first year was tough getting used to training but I feel a lot more comfortable now. I guess it's the same in any environment.

 

"But I had experience last year in some big games which helps, I've just got to get my body right."

 

Good revealed that he had received some ribbing from the Newcastle's French colony after the Socceroos' 6-0 debacle in Paris where four of his teammates Loic Remy, Yohan Cabaye, Moussa Sissoko and Mathieu Debuchy all involved.

 

"They said if Debuchy is scoring with left then there's issues," he said.

 

"But they were a bit shocked, they expected a bit more competitive game."

 

Though uncapped at international level, Good, who has almost five years left on his Magpies contract, hoped to get a chance prior to the 2014 World Cup.

 

"The World Cup is definitely the goal. The players that have been there talk so highly of it, it's the holy grail.

 

http://www.foxsports.com.au/football/premier-league/young-australian-curtis-good-hoping-for-a-debut-with-newcastle-united/story-e6frf4a3-1226750709345

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Apparently Madaschi has been released by Jeju. Hasn't featured for them much recently. Expect Sydney FC to fit him under the cap.

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We may pick him up and play him as a no10 while harry is injured, makes sense given our current 2 first team choices for RB

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Australian footballers travel far and wide - with mixed success

 

4 December 2013

 

Simon Colosimo was standing alone in his new apartment. The Australian had just arrived in India to play for Dempo Soccer Club and after being greeted at the airport, he’d been left to his own devices in what was meant to be his new home. Already feeling the absence of his wife and children back in Melbourne, Colosimo took another look around his new surroundings and thought to himself, “What am I doing in India?”

 

The Australian’s journey to the fringes of the football world began while he was still playing with his last A-League side, Melbourne Heart. Two years before he signed with Dempo, Colosimo travelled to India as part of his role with the Australian players union.

 

“I came to India with Fifpro and Professional Footballers Australia,” Colosimo explains. “I met some great people here, It was always sort of my plan when I finished in the A-League to spend a year somewhere in Asia where I could do some PFA/Fifpro work and help the players get organised and set up.”

 

“Countries like India, China, Indonesia where there’s so much football passion, getting these countries organised can do a great deal for football.”

 

So despite the difficult surroundings Colosimo persevered. First came a new apartment, then a spa membership at the local five-star hotel allowing him the facilities to get massages after training and hold his own recovery sessions in the pool. After five weeks his club even got wheelie bins the players could use for ice baths. “Now when I’m sitting in my apartment or the places where I eat or the hotel I don’t feel like I’m in the middle of nowhere,” he says.

 

Despite having acclimatised, the challenges haven’t stopped coming. On one away trip the team needed three flights to get to Kolkata with the game a further two hours drive away. With the host city not having a suitable hotel for the team to stay at they decided to make the two-hour journey on game day.

 

“Little did we know the bus ride would be bumps all the way,” Colosimo says. “I thought I’d get an hour’s (sleep) in on the bus, but it’s bouncing up and down and I thought OK that’s not working. So I thought I’d read a book and the book’s going up and down and that’s not working. So I decided I’d just chat with the boys.” Then the bus broke down.

 

“To do this (playing in India), if you don’t have the right mental strength you will not succeed,” he says. “It’s very difficult mentally.”

 

Colosimo isn’t alone in venturing from Australia into unfamiliar circumstances. Beyond world football’s more traditional leagues, Australians currently play in over 35 countries in locations as diverse as Fiji through to Iran. For the few, big contracts and glamorous football careers await, but for the rest chasing their football dream often takes them to the fringes of the game’s sphere and all the difficulties that come with it.

 

While the idea of living and playing on Fiji’s tropical coast or in an Asian metropolis sounds enticing, the reality can be underwhelming. Many receive modest pay cheques often below the average salary for an A-League player, that's if their pay arrives on time, and spend long afternoons playing video games or on the internet while missing family back home.

Cultural differences and the way professionalism is enforced vary as well. Some Australians playing in China have run up against early evening curfews and bans on using mobile phones when a team is losing. It can leave a player reassessing how much they are willing to put up with to keep their football careers alive.

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/football/2013/dec/04/australian-footballers-travel-far-and-wide-with-mixed-success?CMP=soc_568

Edited by Murfy1

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Australian footballers travel far and wide - with mixed success

 

4 December 2013

 

Simon Colosimo was standing alone in his new apartment. The Australian had just arrived in India to play for Dempo Soccer Club and after being greeted at the airport, he’d been left to his own devices in what was meant to be his new home. Already feeling the absence of his wife and children back in Melbourne, Colosimo took another look around his new surroundings and thought to himself, “What am I doing in India?”

 

The Australian’s journey to the fringes of the football world began while he was still playing with his last A-League side, Melbourne Heart. Two years before he signed with Dempo, Colosimo travelled to India as part of his role with the Australian players union.

 

“I came to India with Fifpro and Professional Footballers Australia,” Colosimo explains. “I met some great people here, It was always sort of my plan when I finished in the A-League to spend a year somewhere in Asia where I could do some PFA/Fifpro work and help the players get organised and set up.”

 

“Countries like India, China, Indonesia where there’s so much football passion, getting these countries organised can do a great deal for football.”

 

So despite the difficult surroundings Colosimo persevered. First came a new apartment, then a spa membership at the local five-star hotel allowing him the facilities to get massages after training and hold his own recovery sessions in the pool. After five weeks his club even got wheelie bins the players could use for ice baths. “Now when I’m sitting in my apartment or the places where I eat or the hotel I don’t feel like I’m in the middle of nowhere,” he says.

 

Despite having acclimatised, the challenges haven’t stopped coming. On one away trip the team needed three flights to get to Kolkata with the game a further two hours drive away. With the host city not having a suitable hotel for the team to stay at they decided to make the two-hour journey on game day.

 

“Little did we know the bus ride would be bumps all the way,” Colosimo says. “I thought I’d get an hour’s (sleep) in on the bus, but it’s bouncing up and down and I thought OK that’s not working. So I thought I’d read a book and the book’s going up and down and that’s not working. So I decided I’d just chat with the boys.” Then the bus broke down.

 

“To do this (playing in India), if you don’t have the right mental strength you will not succeed,” he says. “It’s very difficult mentally.”

 

Colosimo isn’t alone in venturing from Australia into unfamiliar circumstances. Beyond world football’s more traditional leagues, Australians currently play in over 35 countries in locations as diverse as Fiji through to Iran. For the few, big contracts and glamorous football careers await, but for the rest chasing their football dream often takes them to the fringes of the game’s sphere and all the difficulties that come with it.

 

While the idea of living and playing on Fiji’s tropical coast or in an Asian metropolis sounds enticing, the reality can be underwhelming. Many receive modest pay cheques often below the average salary for an A-League player, that's if their pay arrives on time, and spend long afternoons playing video games or on the internet while missing family back home.

Cultural differences and the way professionalism is enforced vary as well. Some Australians playing in China have run up against early evening curfews and bans on using mobile phones when a team is losing. It can leave a player reassessing how much they are willing to put up with to keep their football careers alive.

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/football/2013/dec/04/australian-footballers-travel-far-and-wide-with-mixed-success?CMP=soc_568

 

Im confused, are they talking about the 3rd world football country of india or MHFC?

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Australian footballers travel far and wide - with mixed success

 

4 December 2013

 

Simon Colosimo was standing alone in his new apartment. The Australian had just arrived in India to play for Dempo Soccer Club and after being greeted at the airport, he’d been left to his own devices in what was meant to be his new home. Already feeling the absence of his wife and children back in Melbourne, Colosimo took another look around his new surroundings and thought to himself, “What am I doing in India?”

 

The Australian’s journey to the fringes of the football world began while he was still playing with his last A-League side, Melbourne Heart. Two years before he signed with Dempo, Colosimo travelled to India as part of his role with the Australian players union.

 

“I came to India with Fifpro and Professional Footballers Australia,” Colosimo explains. “I met some great people here, It was always sort of my plan when I finished in the A-League to spend a year somewhere in Asia where I could do some PFA/Fifpro work and help the players get organised and set up.”

 

“Countries like India, China, Indonesia where there’s so much football passion, getting these countries organised can do a great deal for football.”

 

So despite the difficult surroundings Colosimo persevered. First came a new apartment, then a spa membership at the local five-star hotel allowing him the facilities to get massages after training and hold his own recovery sessions in the pool. After five weeks his club even got wheelie bins the players could use for ice baths. “Now when I’m sitting in my apartment or the places where I eat or the hotel I don’t feel like I’m in the middle of nowhere,” he says.

 

Despite having acclimatised, the challenges haven’t stopped coming. On one away trip the team needed three flights to get to Kolkata with the game a further two hours drive away. With the host city not having a suitable hotel for the team to stay at they decided to make the two-hour journey on game day.

 

“Little did we know the bus ride would be bumps all the way,” Colosimo says. “I thought I’d get an hour’s (sleep) in on the bus, but it’s bouncing up and down and I thought OK that’s not working. So I thought I’d read a book and the book’s going up and down and that’s not working. So I decided I’d just chat with the boys.” Then the bus broke down.

 

“To do this (playing in India), if you don’t have the right mental strength you will not succeed,” he says. “It’s very difficult mentally.”

 

Colosimo isn’t alone in venturing from Australia into unfamiliar circumstances. Beyond world football’s more traditional leagues, Australians currently play in over 35 countries in locations as diverse as Fiji through to Iran. For the few, big contracts and glamorous football careers await, but for the rest chasing their football dream often takes them to the fringes of the game’s sphere and all the difficulties that come with it.

 

While the idea of living and playing on Fiji’s tropical coast or in an Asian metropolis sounds enticing, the reality can be underwhelming. Many receive modest pay cheques often below the average salary for an A-League player, that's if their pay arrives on time, and spend long afternoons playing video games or on the internet while missing family back home.

Cultural differences and the way professionalism is enforced vary as well. Some Australians playing in China have run up against early evening curfews and bans on using mobile phones when a team is losing. It can leave a player reassessing how much they are willing to put up with to keep their football careers alive.

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/football/2013/dec/04/australian-footballers-travel-far-and-wide-with-mixed-success?CMP=soc_568

 

Im confused, are they talking about the 3rd world football country of india or MHFC?

 

is there a difference?

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So despite the difficult surroundings Colosimo persevered. First came a new apartment, then a spa membership at the local five-star hotel allowing him the facilities to get massages after training and hold his own recovery sessions in the pool. After five weeks his club even got wheelie bins the players could use for ice baths. “Now when I’m sitting in my apartment or the places where I eat or the hotel I don’t feel like I’m in the middle of nowhere,” he says.

 

Amazing what homesickness can make you crave. Wheelie bins make you feel so at home. Poor bloke.

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After transfer woes and injuries, Eli Babalj is set to leave Australia a little older and wiser

 

David Davutovic   Herald Sun   January 02, 2014

 

HE has netted Melbourne Heart more than $650,000 in transfer fees but striker Eli ­Babalj's overseas spells have so far been disappointing for reasons beyond his control.

 

Having recovered from ­hernia and adductor surgery that has kept him out since September, Babalj, who ­returns to his Dutch club AZ Almaar this weekend, hopes to be fit and pushing for selection by the end of the month.

 

Babalj, who was given AZ's No. 9 shirt, is happy he can focus on playing after his experience at Red Star Belgrade, where he was ostracised after the coach who signed him, Robert Prosinecki, was sacked.

 

He returned to Heart last January after Red Star failed to pay the final instalment of his $400,000-plus transfer fee before AZ signed him in August.

 

"It's taught me a lot,'' Babalj, 22, said. "It opens your eyes up and shows you not everything comes easy in football, but I guess it's good to go through this stuff early in your career and it makes you wiser.

 

"Looking back you learn a lot from it and take that into the future. I don't think many players have gone through what I have - contracts, legal issues, injuries - but there's been some positives too. I'm grateful to be where I am considering what's happened. Hopefully the bad stuff is in the past and I can concentrate on playing the game I love.

 

"I'm really close to full training. Surgery went well and I look forward to going back and showing the new coach who I am. Every training session is a trial for me.''

 

Babalj, who spent Christmas and New Year's in Melbourne, has a challenge on his hands to displace US international striker Aron Johannsson, who has scored 11 goals for AZ this season.

 

But the youngster capped twice by the Socceroos knows that with few Aussies playing regularly at big European clubs, things can quickly change.

 

"Everyone dreams of playing at a World Cup,'' Babalj said. "I'm only 22 and I'm sure there's a couple more World Cups that I can make,'' he said."I've just got to concentrate on breaking into AZ and, if I do, I'm sure the national team will take care of itself.''

 

"I'm not thinking about the national team at all, you've got to play for your club and I'm sure if I do, which is one of the biggest clubs that any of the Australian boys are playing at, I'm sure the national team will take care of itself."

 

 

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/football/after-transfer-woes-and-injuries-eli-babalj-is-set-to-leave-australia-a-little-older-and-wiser/story-fni2wcjl-1226793961613

Edited by Murfy1

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[...]

 

Former Melbourne Heart defender Michael Marrone (Shanghai Shenxin) and former Victory defender Daniel Mullen (Dalian Aerbin) would also consider returning [to Australia] it's understood.

 

[...]

 

Attacker Nathan Burns could be subject to A-League bids - he will return to Korean club Incheon United after his loan spell at Newcastle Jets finishes on January 11 while defender Brendan Hamill's status at Seongnam is unclear as he returns from a loan with fellow Koreans Gangwon.

 

 

http://mobile.news.com.au/sport/football/victory-considering-selling-mitch-nichols-with-asian-stars-looking-to-return/story-fnk9a3dc-1226796116474

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From the same article.

"We've basically got two new recruits starting with us this month, guys who haven't featured at all and a couple of young guys who haven't played much who continue to improve so unless players leave in this window we're unlikely to bring anyone in,'' football manager John Didulica said.

Can't see anyone leaving.

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From the same article.

"We've basically got two new recruits starting with us this month, guys who haven't featured at all and a couple of young guys who haven't played much who continue to improve so unless players leave in this window we're unlikely to bring anyone in,'' football manager John Didulica said.

Can't see anyone leaving.

We shouldn't be waiting. We should be pushing out the deadwood. Like other clubs do.

 

But at last JD emerges from hibernation...

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From the same article.

"We've basically got two new recruits starting with us this month, guys who haven't featured at all and a couple of young guys who haven't played much who continue to improve so unless players leave in this window we're unlikely to bring anyone in,'' football manager John Didulica said.Can't see anyone leaving.

We shouldn't be waiting. We should be pushing out the deadwood. Like other clubs do.

 

But at last JD emerges from hibernation...

We know that but the club haven't a clue.

My guess is that nothing will happen until the sale of the club.

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The issue with the A-League is that you can't actually sell to other teams in the competition, so, when you're looking at moving players on you've either got to find a buyer overseas (unlikely if the player is shite or requires a work permit etc), sell them to a local club at a lower level (not happening, wages, fees, players not wanting to drop a level etc.) or release them...which is really the only option mid-season.

 

Can't see our board agreeing to pay out a player's contract with a sale on the horizon and if I was buying this club I wouldn't be looking to make sweeping changes until I'd appointed a new manager, you want to be able to let him bring in his own players, staff etc.

 

We're stuck with the squad we have for now.

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Gerald Sibon has tweeted that he's back at SC Heerenveen, and will be involved with their academy and in scouting.

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I actually rated D-Mac (although a lot don't). I always thought we looked better going forward with in him the team. Could we do better, YES, but in terms of the players we have, I had the most confidence in him.

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Dylan Macallister scores on debut for Eastern AA in the Hong Kong league Rofls

He's already equalled his goal tally for Heart

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Dylan Macallister scores on debut for Eastern AA in the Hong Kong league Rofls

He's already equalled his goal tally for Heart

 

Comes on in the 71st minute and scores.

For Heart, comes on in the 70th minute and gets sent off 11 minutes later.

Well rid of him. Lovely bloke and all that, but...

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Josip Skoko on Australia’s World Cup dream

 

Steven Talevski

 

A member of Australia’s historic 2006 World Cup squad, Josip Skoko is uniquely placed to discuss how players feel as the battle for selection intensifies ahead of Brazil. He chats to Steven Talevksi about his experiences in Germany, scoring a stunner against Greece and whether Lucas Neill will be on the plane to Rio.

 

Your Socceroos career lasted 10 years, culminating in the 2006 World Cup campaign. Tell us a bit about that period and what would be running through the minds of Australias current crop five months out from their date with destiny.

 

It was a very exciting period and was a bit of an unknown. It was the first time we had qualified in our era and I wanted to be part of it. I had just moved to Wigan, so it was difficult for me as I knew I had to play. Everyone wanted to play and have their opportunity to be part of the squad. In my situation I put country before club and went to all the camps, which probably cost me in my first season with Wigan because I was away at camp during the start of the season and the team went on a winning run, I couldn’t get in the team for at least half the season. It sort of cost me. But I said I would give the World Cup a crack and whatever happens, happens. I ended up going on loan to be fit and in good form so it is an exciting time, but for players it is about getting games and being healthy and ready for it.

 

In January 2006 you made a loan move to Stoke City from Wigan. How difficult was that decision? Do you believe the likes of Tom Rogic and Mitch Nichols have made the right decisions?

 

For some people it means making tough decisions because everyone wants to be playing. It’s a tough decision because what’s right for your country might not be for your club career. Tom Rogic is just looking to get games and it might not be good for his career going forward, or it might work out – because he has left a club that he can probably prosper more at. He wants to be involved and playing so he really wants to do what’s right by him and be involved with the national team. There is no right or wrong, everyone just wants to be fit enough to be in consideration for the World Cup. For me personally it wasn’t a difficult decision to go on loan because I didn’t move as I was travelling from Manchester to Wigan and that was travelling north for half an hour, to Stoke it was south for 40 minutes. It didn’t mean much as I didn’t have to relocate and the coach who called me at Stoke was a former coach of mine from Holland. For me it was a no brainer, I wasn’t playing at Wigan and my coach is actually the one who instigated it. It was a win-win all the way for me.  

 

One of your teammates at the 2006 World Cup was Lucas Neill. He is currently clubless, do you think he should still be a legitimate candidate for a spot in Brazil?

 

These days I think a little bit more as a coach and my decision as a coach is that if I have a player that is really important to me, it doesn’t matter if he is 100 per cent fit or 70 per cent fit, I will use him. Even if he is not fit or hasn’t played, the team goes away for four or five weeks before the World Cup so that is plenty of time to get fit. Match practice is of course different to training but you play four or five games in that time so even the players that have played full seasons might be worse off than the guys who are fresh, because they have played a lot of games, are burnt out, have had no rest and are straight into camp and preparation so it can work out the wrong way. I am not necessarily someone who says if you’re not playing, you’re not in consideration, I don’t think that is the right way to think about it. The coaches have to think about who is important to the team and try to get them right, help them out as quality is of great importance. It’s up to Ange [Postecoglou] to see who are the players of great importance and if Lucas Neill is part of that vision, then me as a coach would make sure that he gets fit in that time before and I’ll accommodate.

 

Heading into the World Cup, there is no hiding away from the difficulty of Australias group. What are your hopes and predictions for the current Socceroos?

 

It’s a really tough group but there is no point thinking about it. Ange has to get the boys fit, get them as familiar with the game plan that he has for them and have a red hot go. I was really disappointed at the last World Cup when the boys didn’t have a go in the first two games. They showed when they did have a crack in the third game that anything is possible in World Cups. Obviously they won’t go all out attack, but have a go and really have a game plan and play to it, don’t just sit back and wait for things to happen. Have a real go and if you end up losing 3-0 then so be it, you’ve had a go and given it your best. It’s not going to be easy and I don’t think it matters which country in the world you are, let alone Australia, this group will be a tough one and difficult to get through. So I think the Aussies have nothing to lose, they can prove a big point by surprising some teams. We’ve done the same in the past in big tournaments like the Confederations Cup when we ended up beating France 1-0.

 

You were an inaugural marquee for the Melbourne Heart. How big do you feel the purchase of the club by the Manchester City-led consortium is and how big can they grow?

 

This is a huge step for them. One of the main things that has kept them back until now has been the facilities and their base. They haven’t really had one out at La Trobe, they have been training on shared pitches. From when I was there until now that is one of the factors that Heart haven’t been able to get right. With Manchester City on board, I’m sure they will analyse the situation and make it a priority that they get themselves a proper base. That is just one of the advantages. They have a network of 40 to 50 scouts worldwide, they have football people in positions and they know what’s necessary to run successful clubs. They can bring all that expertise to the Heart. It will be an interesting period for Melbourne Heart and I’m sure it will be a big positive.

 

Something on the mind of supporters is whether the club will change its colours and name. Should they?

 

I think the new owners will speak to the fans and won’t do something without consulting and making sure it’s the right thing. I think a club’s history shouldn’t really be tampered with. I think the Heart have a great name, a brand, a shirt that stands out. I think it’s up to them and the vision they have for the club to be put forward to the people and fans and decisions to be made from there.

 

Finally, I can’t help but ask what was going through your head when you hit that stunning volley against the reigning European Champions Greece at a packed Melbourne Cricket Ground in 2006?

 

(Laughing) Not much. It was just hit-it and hope for the best. Whenever you’re on the edge of the box you’re on your toes waiting for something to pop out and my eyes lit up when it did. I think Mile Sterjovski put it back towards me and my eyes lit up. Some of the best coaches say make sure you score or kick it out of the stadium, so there is no counter attack. So I went for it and it went in, it was a great feeling.

 

 

http://thenewdaily.com.au/sport/2014/02/04/josip-skoko-australias-world-cup-dream/

Edited by Murfy1

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Farina banishes Carle and Thompson


10 February 2014-SBS: Philip Micallef

The crisis engulfing Sydney FC has deepened after embattled coach Frank Farina banished Nick Carle and Matt Thompson from first-team training on Monday.

Carle and Thompson were ordered to train separately when the players assembled at Macquarie University.

Farina made the drastic decision two days after the Sky Blues suffered a heavy 3-0 defeat against Adelaide United at Allianz Stadium.

In one of the darkest days in the club's history banners calling for Farina's and chairman Scott Barlow's sacking were unfurled before security staff ordered their removal and ejected the leader of the Cove supporter group.

The ejection was followed by a mass walkout of the supporter group at halftime.

Farina was also the target of a fan who threw a drink at him during the first half and had to be escorted off the field at half-time and full-time.

Carle is believed to have been punished by Farina for his post-match television interview on Saturday in which he expressed his frustration at playing in an unfamiliar position.

Carle, who has another season left in his contract, is one of Sydney's most creative players but he has played in a holding midfielder's role all season.

"When you come on as a sub you want to help the team as much as you can," Carle said.

"I sort of worked hard but, really, playing in that deep role it's a mile to get up and help."

Thompson, who is on a short-term injury replacement deal, is understood to have suffered the consequences of complaining publicly at his lack of game time.

Farina's drastic action is seen as a move to establish control over the playing group that was rocked last season by a dispute between the coach and Jason Culina that resulted in the midfielder's decision to quit the game.

Farina is under intense pressure to save his job and if Sydney does not finish in the top four this season he will be dismissed.

Carle's falling-out with Farina might pave the way for the player to return to his former club Newcastle, which has been crying out for a genuine No 10 since he left the Jets at the end of 2006-2007.

http://theworldgame.sbs.com.au/news/1181160/Farina-banishes-Carle-and-Thompson

Edited by Peter

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Ante joins

Ange at Roos

http://www.fourfourtwo.com/au/news/ante-joins-ange-roos

Western Sydney Wanderers

assistant coach Ante Milicic is set to

join Ange Postecoglou with the

Socceroos for the next three years,

Football Federation Australia

revealed today.

The former Socceroo joins Postecoglou’s

staff after stints as an assistant with the

Wanderers and Melbourne Heart in the A-League, the Australian Institute of Sport and

as head coach of Sydney United in the NSW

Premier League.

“I’m honoured to have been handed such a

tremendous opportunity to work as an

assistant coach with the Socceroos,” Milicic

said. “As a former Socceroo I am passionate

about the National team and I look forward

to the challenge.

“I’m excited to be able to work with Ange,

especially with the World Cup coming up as

well as the Asian Cup in Australia and with so

many talented players starting to break

through.

“I’ve had a good apprenticeship under John

van’t Schip and Poppa (Tony Popovic) as

well as the 2009 and 2011 U20 World Cups as

an assistant to Jan Versleijen and I’m

looking forward to continuing that under

Ange.

“I’d also like to thank the Western Sydney

Wanderers for allowing me to take this

opportunity and I am determined to finish

the A-League season with the same passion

and dedication I will take to the national

team.”

Milicic will remain with Western Sydney

Wanderers until the end of this season but

will join Postecoglou for the Socceroos clash

with Ecuador in London on March 5.

“I’m delighted that Ante Milicic will be

coming on board as an assistant coach with

the Socceroos,” Postecoglou said. “One of

my priorities after becoming national team

head coach was to secure quality staff to

help drive the Socceroos and Ante is a driven

coach who will fit into our environment.

“I wanted the best people to come in and

contribute to the growth and success of the

national team and I’m confident Ante will

add further expertise to our existing staff.

“Ante has experience at domestic level and

International level with both senior and

junior national teams and will play a part in

an exciting new era as we look to build the

next golden generation of Australian

footballers.

“I’d like to take this opportunity to thank

Western Sydney Wanderers for their

cooperation to ensure I was able to appoint

the people I thought were best for the job.”

Western Sydney Wanderers Executive

Chairman Lyall Gorman supported Milicic in

his decision and wished him well: “Our club

is fully supportive and excited about Ante’s

appointment to this prestigious role,”

Gorman said.

“A part of our commitment at the Wanderers

is to provide an environment that fosters

ambition for everyone associated with the

club and that encourages and supports each

individual to maximize their career

aspirations and opportunities.

“The role of assistant coach of the Socceroos

is a tremendous professional and career

development opportunity for Ante and we

wish him well, safe in the knowledge that

should the time come in the future for him to

return to a coaching role in the Hyundai A-League it will be with our club.”

Aurelio Vidmar will also remain as Assistant

Coach for the Socceroos and continue with

his duties as Head Coach of the Olyroos

(National U23 team).

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I, like many members here, still can't believe we selected Aloisi over Ante. ah, the missed opportunity!!

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Rise and rise of Milicic condemns Heart's Aloisi choice

 

Feb 11, 2014 1:33:00 PM

 

Once both vying for the same job at the red and whites, the career of one has gone from strength to strength, while the other was axed from his position earlier this season

 

COMMENT

By Iain Strachan

In February 2012 Melbourne Heart had a difficult decision to make - picking a replacement for inaugural head coach John van 't Schip, who had announced his intention to leave at the end of the 2011-12 season, his second in charge of the club.

With nine months between then and the start of the new campaign, the club had plenty of time to get it right. In May they confirmed John Aloisi would be promoted to the top job after just one season as their national youth team coach.

Having Aloisi as a figurehead would have been an enticing prospect for a fledgling franchise struggling to build a profile in Melbourne's saturated sporting marketplace.

Just 36 at the time, the former striker, already a polished media performer, was the hero whose decisive penalty sent Australia to the 2006 FIFA World Cup.  

Unfortunately, in opting for the handsome, engaging novice, Heart overlooked one of the most talented young coaches in the country.

Another former Socceroo, Ante Milicic was on Heart's coaching staff under Van't Schip, and had also served as head coach of NSW Premier League side Sydney United, as well as spells working with Australia's Young Socceroos. 

Having been overlooked for the Heart hotseat, Milicic joined Tony Popovic at Western Sydney Wanderers, where the duo guided the A-League's newest franchise to the Premier's Plate and grand final in their debut season.

That was an achievement Heart can still only dream of, despite now being into their fourth campaign in the competition. 

 

On Tuesday it was announced that Milicic had joined the backroom staff of Socceroos coach Ange Postecoglou ahead of the World Cup.

Being head-hunted by Australia's leading tactician to work with the national team on the biggest stage of all is another ringing endorsement of Milicic's ability, and serves to further condemn Heart's mistake in failing to appoint him.

Having sacked Aloisi in December, Van 't Schip is back in charge on an interim basis. Results have improved and the takeover by Manchester City means there is cause for enormous optimism at the club.

But there is no denying Heart have effectively wasted a year and a half without achieving noticeable progress, both on and off the field. 

And mistakes made by the club's administrators, such as the decision to overlook Milicic, are unlikely to be viewed favourably by the new owners during what is certain to be an exhaustive review of personnel and policies.

 

http://www.goal.com/en-sg/news/3883/features/2014/02/11/4610740/rise-and-rise-of-milicic-condemns-hearts-aloisi-choice

Edited by Murfy1
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Poor Milicic. He could have been John Aloisi's assistant, but instead he went on to waste his coaching career.

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Poor Milicic. He could have been John Aloisi's assistant, but instead he went on to waste his coaching career.

lol. That's the other bizzare thing about the decision. Not only picking the inexperienced guy, but then somehow expecting Milicic to stay and work underneath him.

 

This decision, more than anything else is what derailed the club. I remember reading a Davutovic article claiming that one of the reasons they chose Aloisi was that Milicic demanded an experienced assistant (smart move, shows good judgement and self awareness), while Aloisi didn't mind who his assistant was. And after Milicic left, we ended up doing the whole thing on the cheap by getting Foxe!!! Looking back on it now, it's hard to believe how dumb the whole thing was.

Edited by Sash

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Poor Milicic. He could have been John Aloisi's assistant, but instead he went on to waste his coaching career.

lol. That's the other bizzare thing about the decision. Not only picking the inexperienced guy, but then somehow expecting Milicic to stay and work underneath him.

 

This decision, more than anything else is what derailed the club. I remember reading a Davutovic article claiming that one of the reasons they chose Aloisi was that Milicic demanded an experienced assistant (smart move, shows good judgement and self awareness), while Aloisi didn't mind who his assistant was. And after Milicic left, we ended up doing the whole thing on the cheap by getting Foxe!!! Looking back on it now, it's hard to believe how dumb the whole thing was.

 

 

It was madness to expect Milicic to stick around as an assistant. And then seemingly because of sour grapes Heart demanded that Milicic stick around for a number of weeks before the club would let him go off to WSW.

 

It could well go down as the worst coaching appointment in Australian football history.

 

It's somewhat ironic as well, because otherwise the board was very good in that they didn't intervene in football decisions. Perth especially and so many other A-League clubs have heavily intervened to pick coaches, players and even suddenly demand that a certain style of football should be played (Wellington last season). As Davutovic said after JA was sacked:

 

Van't Schip once said Heart was on the way up because the board didn't interfere in football decisions - and the first time they did it backfired sensationally.

 

The new board/owners will probably influence football decisions significantly more, if only by demanding that Heart follow a broad template (play good football, follow the City philosophy, promote youth, etc.). But if they do it'll be football people influencing Heart's football decisions, and not the likes of Sidwell and co. So glad to see the back of them.

Edited by Murfy1

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It could well go down as the worst coaching appointment in Australian football history.

Spot on!!!!

 

I considered posting the same thing, but decided against another anti-Aloisi diatribe. 

 

Football's equivalent of Collingwood appointing Tony Shaw or Balmain appointing Alan Jones.   

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It could well go down as the worst coaching appointment in Australian football history.

Spot on!!!!

 

I considered posting the same thing, but decided against another anti-Aloisi diatribe. 

 

Football's equivalent of Collingwood appointing Tony Shaw or Balmain appointing Alan Jones.   

 

 

I didn't write that lightly. I only recently concluded that it could become the worst appointment because: 1) statistically, Aloisi is 1 of the 3 worst coaches to coach in the A-League (http://www.ultimatealeague.com/records.php?type=mgr&show=msm) 2) we surely would have done must better if they appointed the other candidate, Milicic and 3) it brought a world of pain upon an already struggling club, and we pretty much needed a takeover after the disastrous season and a half reign of Aloisi.

 

I genuinely do wish Aloisi all the best, but it was a really awful match having him coach Heart, and history surely won't judge his coaching record at Heart kindly.

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I don't hate the guy either.  Admire him for what he achieved as a player (and i don't mean THAT penalty).  First Aussie to play in the top flight in England, Spain and Italy.

 

I doubt he will coach at this level again. He just seemed to not learn fast enough in what is truly a school of hard knocks.  Media seems more likely.

 

Also those stats - I don't like how they ignore draws (which Aloisi never got) - a better measure is "points per game".

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I don't hate the guy either. Admire him for what he achieved as a player (and i don't mean THAT penalty). First Aussie to play in the top flight in England, Spain and Italy.

I doubt he will coach at this level again. He just seemed to not learn fast enough in what is truly a school of hard knocks. Media seems more likely.

Also those stats - I don't like how they ignore draws (which Aloisi never got) - a better measure is "points per game".

2nd paragraph: that's what everyone said about Postecoglu,, and look at him now.

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I don't hate the guy either. Admire him for what he achieved as a player (and i don't mean THAT penalty). First Aussie to play in the top flight in England, Spain and Italy.

I doubt he will coach at this level again. He just seemed to not learn fast enough in what is truly a school of hard knocks. Media seems more likely.

Also those stats - I don't like how they ignore draws (which Aloisi never got) - a better measure is "points per game".

2nd paragraph: that's what everyone said about Postecoglu,, and look at him now.

 

 

 

To be fair to Postecoglou, he was highly successful at South. Aloisi on the other hand was not successful in his prior engagement as Heart youth coach. IMO Postecoglou is the sort of manager who needs time to influence his players, something you don't really get when coaching a national side, be it the Olyroos or the senior side.

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Curtis Good scored Dundee United's second goal in their 3-2 win over Kilmarnock.

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