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marteaux

Literature Thread

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Woody    642

Anyone else had a look at the Everfresh Blackbook?

Some really cool work. Missed the chance to go with a mate and check out their studio. Still kicking myself.

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KSK_47    5,475

Being that I am hanging shit on people about their lack of literary conversation, I suppose I should probably contribute...

At the moment I am reading this...

The+Hell+of+it+All.jpg

My verdict- Its Okay. A lot of the time I dont know what he is on about because he is talking about English TV that we never got here but its kind of funny. I cant be bothered explaining what it is so here is a synopsis written by someone who could be bothered...

"It took me a while to get through The Hell of it All, the third compilation of Charlie Brooker's Guardian columns, and not because I didn't enjoy it, it's just that a little Charlie goes a long way. 'A genius of spleen' reads the Independent's front cover quote, and they're right, but page after page after page of spleen can be fairly hard going. Brooker's style is hilarious and he's great at pulling apart awful TV shows in his Screen Burn columns or offering sarcastic comment on world events in his other articles. It's not often he showers praise on anything. So a couple of year's worth of splentic articles can become a little wearying if not portioned out over a few weeks, months, years. Brooker has a mastery with the English language that I can only dream of, and his way around a simile or metaphor is to be greatly admired. When you read Screen Burn you really do wonder at the amount of crap that is broadcast on TV these days, and Charlie Brooker is a great guide through the worst of it, talking honestly and with real vitriol, but he saves it for where it's needed."

http://theresnotime-jrm.blogspot.com.au/2011_01_01_archive.html

Its not a patch on his fake TV guide TV Go Home which I was given as a Christmas present about five years ago and it still makes me laugh. Seriously has me in tears laughing. There is also a TV Go Home website if you are that way inclined.

http://www.tvgohome.com/

1796389.jpg

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AyeCee    647

I read fuck all now, but was a heavy reader back in my younger days. Year 10-11 I focussed on getting some of the classics out of the way, and feel that nothing else will compare now.

Highly acclaimed I know, but these titles deserve their recommendations:

Catch 22.

Possibly the funniest book I have ever read, whilst remaining deeply disturbing. Bit hard to follow at some parts, but when a section finally makes sense, you can't help but smile like an idiot when you realise what the author did. That being said, took me a good year to finish, could only handle in small amounts. The movie of the book is much the same, amusing to those in the know, whilst just plain confusing to newcomers. The general sillyness of the novel is the highlight, with a small laugh on every page.

Lolita.

Yes, it's about a pedophile. Yes, it was banned in several countries. However, many people consider this one of the greatest novels ever, and for good reason. The actual story isn't anything incredible, and there isn't anything explicit in the text. Instead, the magic comes from how Nabokov uses the english language, reading this book is absolute bliss. Every word flows beautifully, and allows for excellent prose.

It's slow moving, but you can't avoid getting caught up in the emotion of it. I say emotion not in the sense of welling up whilst reading, but more so just having a sense of melancholy during your normal everyday life. Nothing will compare to this novel, I will read this over and over. Changed. My. Life.

A Clockwork Orange.

I can't decide on whether I like the movie or the novel more, both were of exceptional quality. One of the better movie adaptions I have seen, I see the two as one peice of art. Basically about having fun out on the town, a usual life of rape, murder and mindless violence, followed by the punishment. Raises many moral questions, but remains a tonne of fun. It's a small book, but you will spend a large amount of time referencing the Nadsat dictionary.

I suggest that those who haven't already read these to atleast give them a go. Can be a struggle in parts, but ultimately rewarding. Plus, at the very least, you'll appear to be a smart cunt, and that's all that matters eh?

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Attila    85

Just purchased a series of Noam Chomsky and Friedrich Nietzsche books. About 7 or 8 books for, 40 dollars. Thank you Ando and Abe Books.

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Woody    642

Recently finished a few Alan Duff novels.

Not the most enjoyable reads, but passed the time nicely on the train to and from uni.

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Woody    642

Always meant to get around borrowing Once We Were Warriors, is it any good?

It's not bad. It wouldn't hurt to do some basic research of Maori vocab, because the books written for an inhouse audience.

Both sides of the Moon I thought was great as I read it whilst I was in the same mindset as the protagonist.

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moops    208

I have loved the use of the English language by Stephen Donaldson, the chronicles of Thomas Covenant the unbeliever, amazing in his use of the English language and prose.

Recent reading cannot compare, intact the closest would be Neal Stephenson.

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moops    208

I read fuck all now, but was a heavy reader back in my younger days. Year 10-11 I focussed on getting some of the classics out of the way, and feel that nothing else will compare now.

Highly acclaimed I know, but these titles deserve their recommendations:

Catch 22.

Possibly the funniest book I have ever read, whilst remaining deeply disturbing. Bit hard to follow at some parts, but when a section finally makes sense, you can't help but smile like an idiot when you realise what the author did. That being said, took me a good year to finish, could only handle in small amounts. The movie of the book is much the same, amusing to those in the know, whilst just plain confusing to newcomers. The general sillyness of the novel is the highlight, with a small laugh on every page.

Lolita.

Yes, it's about a pedophile. Yes, it was banned in several countries. However, many people consider this one of the greatest novels ever, and for good reason. The actual story isn't anything incredible, and there isn't anything explicit in the text. Instead, the magic comes from how Nabokov uses the english language, reading this book is absolute bliss. Every word flows beautifully, and allows for excellent prose.

It's slow moving, but you can't avoid getting caught up in the emotion of it. I say emotion not in the sense of welling up whilst reading, but more so just having a sense of melancholy during your normal everyday life. Nothing will compare to this novel, I will read this over and over. Changed. My. Life.

A Clockwork Orange.

I can't decide on whether I like the movie or the novel more, both were of exceptional quality. One of the better movie adaptions I have seen, I see the two as one peice of art. Basically about having fun out on the town, a usual life of rape, murder and mindless violence, followed by the punishment. Raises many moral questions, but remains a tonne of fun. It's a small book, but you will spend a large amount of time referencing the Nadsat dictionary.

I suggest that those who haven't already read these to atleast give them a go. Can be a struggle in parts, but ultimately rewarding. Plus, at the very least, you'll appear to be a smart cunt, and that's all that matters eh?

Thx1138?

great adaptation from the book.

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Tesla    8,097

Just stopped by too say that Atlas Shrugged is the GOAT book.

I read 1/4 of the Library of Alexandria before it burnt down, and none of the written works there were on the level of Atlas Shrugged.

In fact, I will no longer engage in any sort of intellectual debate with anyone who hasnt read this book, as it would be a fruitless endeavour.

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Woody    642

Spend so much time on public transport that I decided to read one book on the way in and one on the way out. Completed both today.

First being Nick Hornby's newest 'How to be good' and like all his other works I loved it. Provocative and real. The other being Wuthering Heights. Read it previously, but reading it again reaffirmed it as my favourite novel.

Now moving onto an Irvine Welsh mash of the trainspotting prequel 'Skagboys' and 'Ecstacy'

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marteaux    2,109

Now moving onto an Irvine Welsh mash of the trainspotting prequel 'Skagboys' and 'Ecstacy'

Picked up these in my school library (lol) and mean to get around to reading them after exams/before holidays end.

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Woody    642

I have not read it. I gave up after Slam. Might have to give it a bash

Agree heavily. Read it and was hugely disappointed.

One of the only Authors I ever regularly re read however.

Edited by Woody

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Woody    642

Anyone heard of or read '11 Seasons' ?

Read it all today.

Incredible write from a Melburnian. Anyone who over thinks, but considers it normal should give it a read. Can't wait to meet the author in a few weeks.

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Woody    642

Documents life through 11 footy seasons. Hawthorn resident and talented footy player. Shit unfolds and guy becomes aware of stuff around him. Typical progression novel, but set in Melbourne makes it more homey.

Won some literary prize just recently.

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moops    208

Thx1138 is a great book!

The man who mistook his wife as a hat' was very good, a psychologists in the 70's, writes about some unusual, yet interesting encounters in his profession.

But as far as lit goes, I love Edgar Allen Poe, alcohol, drug driven American, whither a rather querky cynical style, quite readable as many of the so called lit allumnea are supposed to be.

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KSK_47    5,475

Thx1138 is a great book!

The man who mistook his wife as a hat' was very good, a psychologists in the 70's, writes about some unusual, yet interesting encounters in his profession.

But as far as lit goes, I love Edgar Allen Poe, alcohol, drug driven American, whither a rather querky cynical style, quite readable as many of the so called lit allumnea are supposed to be.

Really want to read The Man Who Mistook His Wife For a Hat. It sounds really interesting.

I have only read Mystery and Imagination by Poe which was quite some time ago. I found his work really hit and miss. As in some of his stuff like "pit and the pendulum" was unbelievable! But then those fucking horrible detective stories were so boring it made me want to stab my brain out with a fork. In the end the good cancelled out the bad and I just felt like "eh, at least I can say I have read one of the greats. Now to something I can really enjoy".

Speaking of enjoying, I was going through all my books the other night and totally forgot I owed The Beach. Think I will read that one again.

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Tommykins    623

Failed States is another good recent Noam. I just finished Paul Krugmans new one End This Depression Now! Would reccomend, can get bogged down in the economics a bit, but still a great read.

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marteaux    2,109

Failed states seems like itd tie in well with what I'm learning right now in my politics class. Also Chomsky's viewpoints would play right into my teachers hands, and he is the type of Kent to enjoy that.

Edited by marteaux

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